The secret history of Mary O’Meara

People are just throwing information at me for Tomorrow’s Songs Today, which this morning is just $2 short of the 25% mark in its IndieGoGo campaign. Leslie Fish has sent me some very useful background information, including how she came to write “Hope Eyrie.” Harold Stein has provided me with complete scans of Rick Weiss’s Filking Times. Most exciting of all, Karen Anderson and Astrid Bear have given me background information on Poul Anderson’s “Mary O’Meara,” including the original Danish song on which he based it. The song is Anna Lovinda. I can’t read Danish, but between the German and Danish cognates I can recognize and Google’s quirky translation (“the song must be worn at Sea Gull Wings”?), it’s clearly the same story.

This weekend I’m interviewing the Golds and Spencer Love.

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One Response to “The secret history of Mary O’Meara”

  1. thnidu Says:

    A Gsearch for “Anna Lovinda” shows 4 YouTube videos at the top. I’m listening to Sissel with Bjørn Eidsvåg and Åge Aleksandersen as I type this. The poster’s notes include this background:
    >>>>>
    Information:”Anna Lovinda” is one of Erik Bye’s most famous songs. Inspiration for the song was Bye from a tombstone in the cemetery in Westport, according to “Norwegian visebok”, a small fishing village on the New England coast. It said (according to the intro to the Byes own recording of the song): “Here lies Anna Lovinda, died 12 april 1872, 20 years old. She was the widow of Captain Ebenezer Hunt, who went down with his ship in the same year, 25 years old. ” Erik Bye was besides being a writer and poet show, also broadcast man, and was for many years in close cooperation with the ALF and Otto Nielsen. The song about “Anna Lovinda” was written in 1960. Helge Lund Borg has also sung this on out of obscurity kap.14
    <<<<<
    And here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6kxG3PUzJM) is a performance in English translation (from the Danish).


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